A Natural Approach to Building a Stronger Coast

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

What is a “living shoreline?” An article recently posted in the Spring 2015 edition of Fish and Wildlife News and the Service’s Open Spaces Blog details how this natural method of shoreline protection is being used to support four Hurricane Sandy recovery projects led by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. In the article, Brittany Bowker, a former Hurricane Sandy youth story corps Student Conservation Association (SCA) intern, provides an overview of the federally funded living shoreline projects making progress in New Jersey, Maryland and Virginia.

Coir logs, an example of a living shoreline technique using interwoven coconut fibers  bound together with biodegradable netting, are set in place at Gandy’s Beach on the Jersey shore to provide temporary physical protection to a site while vegetation becomes established. Coir logs, an example of a living shoreline technique using interwoven coconut fibers bound together with biodegradable netting, are set in place at Gandy’s Beach on the Jersey shore to provide temporary physical protection to a site while vegetation becomes established. Credit: Katie Conrad/USFWS

There was a time when shoreline protection often meant installing hard structures like bulkheads or riprap to armor the coast…

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Author: rjbailey

"I have no idea what I'm doing, but I know I'm doing it really, really well." - Andy Dwyer

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