Some D&D5e Magic Items

Dyson's Dodecahedron

I’ve wanted to post these items for some time, but keep trying to illustrate them first. But my illustration skills remain weak, and I’m finally posting them to get them out of my “to do” list. These are magic items I created for our last D&D5e campaign that is now over – I believe some of them were never found or were not used after being found.

Esturk’s Amaranthine Blades

Require Attunement
These leather bracers with silver buckles and edging allow the wearer to attack with any number of darts (limited by the character’s attacks per round). These darts are created as the wearer “draws” them from the bracers. The darts exist for 3 rounds once drawn, and shed a white light with the intensity of a torch. They are treated as magic weapons, but gain no attack or damage bonus. The bracers must be worn as a pair to…

View original post 433 more words

Advertisements

Sharing My World — 1-17-17

It’s been a while, but here’s my entry for this week’s Share Your World!

Do you sleep with your closet doors open or closed?

Closed.

Do you take the shampoos and conditioner bottles from hotel?

Usually.

What is your usual bedtime?

Usually between 11-11:30.

Do you like to use post-it notes?

Occasionally.

When was the last time you wrote a letter to someone on paper?

I dunno. 🙄

Any phobias?

shrug

How tall are you?

[REDACTED]

Optional Bonus question:  What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up?

Not sure about this week, but I’m thankful my area didn’t get as bad an ice problem as what the middle of the country got.

Nice set of questions this week!

Like what you see? Leave comments!

The Hero’s Journey, Abridged and with Gifs (Part One)

The Afictionado

A while back, a dude named Joseph Campbell wrote a book called The Hero with a Thousand Faces where he presented the idea that most myths, legends, folk tales and stories are all inherently dealing with the same themes and telling the same tale. He drew this up in a map of The Hero’s Journey, which has been adopted as a nigh-essential tool for story mapping and writing ever since, and details the archetypes that run through a lot of powerful stories from all around the world. It ties nicely into the screenwriting Three Act Structure, which is also a really useful tool for writing stories and character arcs effectively, so they’re both worth studying if you’re interested in knowing what, by tried and true practice going back many thousands of years, seems to make a good story. This archetypal map is the foundation for my thesis, so this post…

View original post 2,085 more words

More Trek news: RISE OF THE FEDERATION — PATTERNS OF INTERFERENCE

Christopher L. Bennett: Written Worlds

The word has been out for a little while now, so it’s high time I mentioned it: My next Star Trek novel after the upcoming The Face of the Unknown will be Star Trek: Enterprise — Rise of the Federation: Patterns of Interference, the fifth book in the ROTF series. Here’s the blurb:

The time has come to act. Following the destructive consequences of the Ware crisis, Admiral Jonathan Archer and Section 31 agent Trip Tucker both attempt to change their institutions to prevent further such tragedies. Archer pushes for a Starfleet directive of non-interference, but he faces opposition from allies within the fleet and unwelcome support from adversaries who wish to drive the Federation into complete isolationism. Meanwhile, Tucker plays a dangerous game against the corrupt leaders of Section 31, hoping to bring down their conspiracy once and for all. But is he willing to jeopardize Archer’s efforts—and…

View original post 91 more words

Field Notes: Junior Innovation Camp

The WordPress.com Blog

Automatticians, the people who build WordPress.com, participate in events and projects around the world every day. Periodically, they report back on the exciting things they do when not in front of a computer.

Today I’d like to share some experiences we had during the Junior Innovator Camp that was part of the Wonder Women Tech conference earlier this summer. I was joined by my colleagues Marjorie Asturias (who also spoke), Sarah Blackstock, Erica Varlese, and Anne McCarthy.

Wonder Women Tech, where Automattic was a sponsor, is a conference that highlights women in STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and math), and provides a forum for discussing important topics around diversity. The two-day event drew over 150 speakers, all of whom were successful entrepreneurs or business leaders, who shared their triumphs, failings, and learned lessons. The conference offered educational opportunities to a number of area students who were attending on scholarships.

My…

View original post 245 more words

On Sulu, diversity, and change (minor STAR TREK BEYOND spoilers)

Christopher L. Bennett: Written Worlds

Well, just days after I made a post assessing my own work for its gender/sexual inclusiveness, we get a noteworthy piece of news from the makers of the upcoming Star Trek Beyond: The movie will establish in passing that Sulu has a husband and a daughter. The daughter is most likely Demora, a character established in Star Trek Generations, but the news everyone’s reacting to is that Sulu is married to a man. This is not being treated as a big deal in the movie, but it’s made quite the ripple in popular culture. The makers of Star Trek have been making noises about LGBT inclusion for decades, but they’ve never followed through until now. We got a few indirect attempts, the boldest being DS9’s “Rejoined” and its then-controversial same-sex kiss between Jadzia Dax and her former husband who was now in a female host — and the…

View original post 1,489 more words

Thoughts on GAMERA THE BRAVE and series overview (spoilers)

Christopher L. Bennett: Written Worlds

Wrapping up my Gamera reviews now, we come to the final film to date, Gamera: The Brave (Chiisaki Yūsha-tachi Gamera, literally Young Braves of Gamera). This film came out in 2006, seven years after the end of Shusuke Kaneko’s trilogy. It’s interesting how the Gamera films after the original series never seem to overlap with Godzilla. The 1980 revival came about midway between the end of the Showa Godzilla series in 1975 and the start of the Heisei series in 1984. The Heisei Gamera trilogy began in 1995, a year after Heisei Godzilla ended, then continued in ’96 and skipped forward to ’99, a year after the TriStar Godzilla and nine months before the start of the Millennium Godzilla series. And Gamera: The Brave came out two years after the Millennium series ended (although it’s still considered a Heisei-era film, since we’re still in the reign of…

View original post 3,310 more words

Thoughts on Gamera: The Heisei-Era trilogy (spoilers)

Christopher L. Bennett: Written Worlds

The main reason I decided to do this Gamera watch-through is because of the acclaim I’d heard for the Gamera reboot trilogy made in the ’90s, and after slogging through the mostly childish, cheesy, formulaic films of the original series, I’m finally there. Intriguingly, these were the first kaiju films directed by Shusuke Kaneko, who would later direct Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack, the best of the Millennium-era Godzilla films. They also have the same composer as that film, Kow Otani. So this should be interesting.

Gamera: The Guardian of the Universe (Gamera: Daikaiju Kuuchuu Kessen, literally Gamera: Giant Monster Midair Battle, almost the same title as the original Gamera vs. Gyaos) came out in 1995, a year after the end of the Heisei-era Godzilla series, and follows its lead by rebooting in a much more serious, mature vein. After…

View original post 2,778 more words

One Liner Wednesday – UEFA Euro 2016

Norm 2.0

For this week’s One-Liner Wednesday by Linda G. Hill:

An acquaintance in Europe asked me who I was rooting for in the UEFA Euro 2016 soccer tournament.

I replied, “I don’t really watch soccer. If I wanted to watch a bunch of guys struggle for 90 minutes and still not score I’d go hang out in a night club”.

View original post

Thoughts on GAMERA: The Showa Era, Part 1 (spoilers)

Christopher L. Bennett: Written Worlds

With my supply of accessible kaiju films from Toho run dry, I’ve decided to tackle Daiei’s Gamera, the most successful knockoff/rival of Godzilla. I remember seeing the Gamera films they spoofed on Mystery Science Theater 3000 and being aware that they tended to be more kid-oriented than a lot of the Godzilla movies, but then, the Godzilla movies of the late ’60s and ’70s were often quite juvenile and silly themselves. I recently happened to discover that Shout Factory TV’s streaming site has nearly all the Gamera movies available for free, and in the original Japanese, so I decided to give them a try. The only one missing from there is the last film to date, 2006’s Gamera the Brave, but that one is available through Netflix DVD rental. Thus I’m able to cover the entire Gamera series comprehensively and in chronological order, which is more than I was…

View original post 2,357 more words