Water on the Moon?

NASA’S LCROSS Impacts Confirm Water In Lunar Crater:

“Preliminary data from NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, indicates the mission successfully uncovered water in a permanently shadowed lunar crater. The discovery opens a new chapter in our understanding of the moon.

The LCROSS spacecraft and a companion rocket stage made twin impacts in the Cabeus crater Oct. 9 that created a plume of material from the bottom of a crater that has not seen sunlight in billions of years. The plume traveled at a high angle beyond the rim of Cabeus and into sunlight, while an additional curtain of debris was ejected more laterally.”

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LCROSS Reveals Target Crater

NASA’s LCROSS Reveals Target Crater for Lunar South Pole Impacts

“MOFFETT FIELD, Calif., Sept. 11 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — NASA has selected a final destination for its Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, after a journey of nearly 5.6 million miles that included several orbits around Earth and the moon. The mission team announced Wednesday that Cabeus A will be the target crater for the LCROSS dual impacts scheduled for 7:30 a.m. EDT on Oct. 9, 2009. The crater was selected after an extensive review as the optimal location for LCROSS’ evaluation of whether water ice exists at the lunar south pole.

“LCROSS will search for water ice by sending its spent upper-stage Centaur rocket to impact the permanently shadowed polar crater. The satellite will fly into the plume of dust left by the impact and measure the properties before also colliding with the lunar surface. The LCROSS team selected Cabeus A based on a set of conditions that include proper debris plume illumination for visibility from Earth, a high concentration of hydrogen, and mature crater features such as a flat floor, gentle slopes and the absence of large boulders.”
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LRO Snaps Its First Pics of Apollo Sites

Exquisite HD Lunar Flyover -  Images from the ...Image by Goddard Photo and Video Blog via Flickr

NASA’s LRO Spacecraft Gets Its First Look At Apollo Landing Sites:

“WASHINGTON, July 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has returned its first imagery of the Apollo moon landing sites. The pictures show the Apollo missions’ lunar module descent stages sitting on the moon‘s surface, as long shadows from a low sun angle make the modules’ locations evident.

“The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC, was able to image five of the six Apollo sites, with the remaining Apollo 12 site expected to be photographed in the coming weeks.

“The satellite reached lunar orbit June 23 and captured the Apollo sites between July 11 and 15. Though it had been expected that LRO would be able to resolve the remnants of the Apollo mission, these first images came before the spacecraft reached its final mapping orbit. Future LROC images from these sites will have two to three times greater resolution.”

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First LRO Images Sent

NASA’s LRO Spacecraft Sends First Lunar Images to Earth:

“GREENBELT, Md., July 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has transmitted its first images since reaching lunar orbit June 23. The spacecraft has two cameras — a low resolution Wide Angle Camera and a high resolution Narrow Angle Camera. Collectively known as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC, they were activated June 30. The cameras are working well and have returned images of a region a few kilometers east of Hell E crater in the lunar highlands south of Mare Nubium.”

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NASA Lunar Mission Successfully Enters Moon Orbit

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (Artist's Conception)Image by Goddard Video and Multimedia via Flickr

NASA Lunar Mission Successfully Enters Moon Orbit:

“GREENBELT, Md., June 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — After a four and a half day journey from the Earth, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has successfully entered orbit around the moon. Engineers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., confirmed the spacecraft’s lunar orbit insertion at 6:27 a.m. EDT Tuesday.”

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